Greening Our Babies Bottoms

Having babies 60-100 years ago must have been a real headache.  I’ve got to hand it to moms of the past who had no disposable diapers and didn’t have our fancy disposable wipes.  What are our modern parents really doing to the environment?  Are those disposable wipes what we think they are?

Most of the disposable wipes come in a nice compact container that seals closed to ensure their freshness and moisture remains with the product.  These wipes can be very handy items, even for things other than a baby’s bottom. It’s very convenient to wipe up a quick mess on the floor or rub clean your 10 year olds face on the way to church with our handy disposable wipes.  But, what are those wipes really made of?  


This is something I never thought about until now when my kids are nearing adulthood - the actual content of the wipe itself....  I decided to investigate disposable baby wipes and was surprised to find out that a wipe can contain any number of these chemicals:
Sodium Diamphoacetat
Coco Phosphatidyl PG-dimonium Chloride
Propylene Glycol
Hydroxymethyl Cellulose
Methy and Propyl Paraben
Triclosan

A disposable wipe can be made from silk, cotton, polyester, wool, rayon, polyethylene or Polypropylene.  The less expensive wipes tend to be made of mostly plastics! 

Moms and dads, stop flushing your used disposable baby wipes, they are NOT  biodegradable, compostable or recyclable. These ever so helpful and convenient wipes have the potential to be toxic to our sea life and the ecosystem.  

So what’s a parent to do with their babies dirty bottom??  Use toilet paper?? 
Here is a link to a website that has recipes for making your own baby wipes. http://www.wikihow.com/Make-Baby-Wipes  &   http://www.diaperjungle.com/cloth-diaper-wipes.html   http://www.jardinediapers.com

I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but that’s what my presence here is for, waking up folks to the greener ways of life.   

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